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Women rugby union coaches’ experiences of formal coach education in Ireland and the United Kingdom: a qualitative study

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dc.contributor.author Barrett, Gareth M.
dc.contributor.author Sherwin, Ian A.
dc.contributor.author Blackett, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-25T12:58:06Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-25T12:58:06Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/9922
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Although the sport of rugby union has expanded globally in both the men’s and women’s formats recently, there remains an under-representation of women coaches across all contexts. Research has focused its analysis on the under-representation of women coaches in a select few sports such as soccer. No extant research has empirically analyzed this under-representation within rugby union. This study addressed this research lacuna on why this under-representation exists from the perspective of 21 women rugby union coaches based within the United Kingdom and Ireland. The specific research objective was to analyze the coaches’ lived experiences of attending formal coach education courses in rugby union. Data were collected through individual semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed thematically and conceptualized via an abductive logic against LaVoi’s Ecological-Intersectional Model and Pierre Bourdieu’s species of capital. Supportive and positive themes reported how the coach education courses had been delivered in a collegiate and lateral manner. Courses thus acted as settings where greater amounts of cultural and social capital could be acquired from both course tutors and peers. This enabled social networks to be made that were used for continual professional development beyond the courses. Barriers and negative experiences orientated upon the lack of empathy imparted by course tutors on account of men having fulfilled these roles on most occasions. Recommendations on how national governing bodies can improve the experiences of women coaches attending future coach education courses are discussed. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Human Kinetics en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Women in Sport and Physical Activity Journal;
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1123/wspaj.2020-0056
dc.rights Accepted author manuscript version reprinted, by permission, from Women in Sport and Physical Activity Journal , 2021, https://doi.org/[doi-number]. © Human Kinetics, Inc. en_US
dc.subject under-representation en_US
dc.subject Ireland en_US
dc.subject capital en_US
dc.subject equality
dc.subject marginalization
dc.title Women rugby union coaches’ experiences of formal coach education in Ireland and the United Kingdom: a qualitative study en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1123/wspaj.2020-0056
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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