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Grace under pressure: resilience, burnout, and wellbeing in frontline workers in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic

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dc.contributor.author Sumner, Rachel C.
dc.contributor.author Kinsella, Elaine Louise
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-18T08:36:28Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-18T08:36:28Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/9793
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract The coronavirus pandemic has necessitated extraordinary human resilience in order to preserve and prolong life and social order. Risks to health and even life are being confronted by workers in health and social care, as well as those in roles previously never defined as “frontline,” such as individuals working in community supply chain sectors. The strategy adopted by the United Kingdom (UK) government in facing the challenges of the pandemic was markedly different from other countries. The present study set out to examine what variables were associated with resilience, burnout, and wellbeing in all sectors of frontline workers, and whether or not these differed between the UK and Republic of Ireland (RoI). Individuals were eligible if they were a frontline worker (in health and social care, community supply chain, or other emergency services) in the UK or RoI during the pandemic en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Frontiers in Psychology;11, 576229
dc.subject coronavirus en_US
dc.subject Covid-19 en_US
dc.subject CV19 heroes en_US
dc.title Grace under pressure: resilience, burnout, and wellbeing in frontline workers in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.576229
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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