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Medication and healthcare utilization variation among older adults with pain

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dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Aoife
dc.contributor.author Purtill, Helen
dc.contributor.author Kelly, Dervla
dc.contributor.author McCreesh, Karen
dc.contributor.author Robinson, Katie
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Kieran
dc.date.accessioned 2021-01-26T15:59:12Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/9664
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Background While pain is very common in older adults, the associated impact on daily life, including usage of medication and healthcare, varies considerably and often pain remains inadequately treated. It is not clear what is associated with this variation. Methods Latent class analysis (LCA) is a model‐based approach to identifying underlying subgroups in a population. In this study LCA was used to examine biopsychosocial risk classes of adults aged 50 years and older, who were often troubled by pain, from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), (n = 2,896), and the associations with future medication and healthcare use. Results Four biopsychosocial risk classes (Low Biopsychosocial Risk, Physical Health Risk, Mental Health Risk, High Biopsychosocial Risk) were identified, with the 'High Biopsychosocial Risk' class accounting for 24% of older adults with pain. This class were much more likely to use medication and healthcare services when followed up across three waves of the TILDA study. In contrast, the Physical Health Risk and the Mental Health Risk classes reported lower usage of medication and healthcare at waves 2 and 3. Amongst the higher risk classes of older adults who are troubled by pain, there is considerable consumption of medication and healthcare services evident. Conclusion Given our ageing population and significant number of adults in this high risk class, there is a need to optimize current pain management approaches among older adults. Intensive non‐pharmacological approaches to pain management in older adults, tailored to individual biopsychosocial risk indicators for each individual class, may be worth exploring. Significance While pain is very common in older adults, the usage of medication and healthcare varies considerably and often pain remains inadequately treated. Given our ageing population and the significant number of older adults reporting high biopsychosocial risk (24%), there is a need to optimize current pain management approaches. Intensive non‐pharmacological approaches to pain management in older adults, tailored to individual biopsychosocial risk indicators for each individual class, may be worth exploring. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Wiley and Sons Ltd en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries European Journal of Pain; 25 (4), PP. 841-851
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.1714
dc.rights This is the peer reviewed author version of the following article: Medication and healthcare utilization variation among older adults with pain, European Journal of Pain which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.1714 . This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html#terms en_US
dc.subject pain en_US
dc.subject older adults en_US
dc.subject ageing population en_US
dc.title Medication and healthcare utilization variation among older adults with pain en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/ejp.1714
dc.date.embargoEndDate 2021-12-16
dc.embargo.terms 2021-12-16 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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