University of Limerick Institutional Repository

Guidance counsellors’ perceptions and experience of creativity in their professional practice and the impact of this creativity on their work with students

DSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Myers, Gerry
dc.contributor.author Murrihy, Moira
dc.date.accessioned 2021-01-26T10:39:20Z
dc.date.available 2021-01-26T10:39:20Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/9658
dc.description non-peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract This study explored Irish post-primary guidance counsellors’ perceptions and experiences in relation to the use of creativity in their own professional practice, and the perceived impact of this creativity on their work with students. The ever-changing macro and micro climate of the twenty-first century (especially COVID-19) is a particularly challenging one for students to navigate at post-primary level. As a result of this evolving uncertain and dynamic economic landscape, students require sustained support and guidance concerning their futures. The literature acknowledges that is more difficult for the students of today to ‘choose a career and then pursue it’ than it has been heretofore (Lengelle and Ashby, 2017, p.404). The old way of ‘doing careers’ no longer adequately serves the needs of today’s students (Reid and West, 2016, p.573). For these reasons, there is a requirement for guidance counselling to be inventive and creative in how the service responds to the new way of engaging with third level and evolving work practices. An interpretivist paradigm was implemented using semi-structured interviews from nine qualified post-primary guidance counsellors practising in Irish schools (Thomas 2013). The findings were interpreted using Braun and Clarke’s (2012) system of thematic analysis. The findings indicate that creativity plays an integral role in guidance counsellors’ professional practice on a day-to-day basis. When it comes to employing creative methods within the classroom and in the one-to-one sessions, ‘one size does not fit all.’ The use of creativity fosters respectful and trusting relationships between guidance counsellors and students. The findings also indicated that having a safe space where students can express themselves is considered important by students. Finally, the research highlights a need for CPD in the area of creativity among guidance counsellors in professional practice. The research concludes with a number of recommendations in relation to policy, practice and research. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher University of Limerick en_US
dc.subject Irish post-primary guidance counsellors en_US
dc.subject Covid-19 en_US
dc.title Guidance counsellors’ perceptions and experience of creativity in their professional practice and the impact of this creativity on their work with students en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/masterThesis en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_theses_dissertations en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ULIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics