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State gratitude is associated with lower cardiovascular responses to acute psychological stress: a replication and extension

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dc.contributor.author Ginty, Annie T.
dc.contributor.author Tyra, Alexandra T.
dc.contributor.author Young, Danielle A.
dc.contributor.author John-Henderson, Neha A.
dc.contributor.author Gallagher, Stephen
dc.contributor.author Tsang, Jo-Ann C.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-17T14:49:54Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/9469
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description The full text of this article will not be available in ULIR until the embargo expires on the 19/10/2021
dc.description.abstract Positive affect is associated with more adaptive responses to psychological stress. However, few studies have examined the association between gratitude, a specific type of positive affect, with physiological responses to acute psychological stress. The current study aimed to replicate and extend on previous work examining the associations between state and trait gratitude and cardiovascular stress reactivity in 324 (59.9% female, 67.0% Caucasian, 17.9% Hispanic) healthy participants. State gratitude was measured at the beginning of the laboratory session using the Gratitude Adjective Checklist-Three Items. Trait gratitude was measured using the Gratitude Questionnaire-Six Items. Blood pressure and heart rate reactions to an acute mental arithmetic task were measured. In regression models that adjusted for baseline cardiovascular activity, body mass index, sex, depressive symptomology, performance on the acute mental arithmetic task, and state positive affect, state gratitude was associated with lower systolic blood pressure reactivity. There were no associations between trait gratitude and any of the cardiovascular variables. Results support previous work demonstrating that state, but not trait, gratitude is related to cardiovascular stress reactivity. Higher levels of state gratitude immediately preceding a stressful encounter may be protective. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries International Journal of Psychophysiology;158, pp. 238-247
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2020.10.005
dc.rights This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in The International Journal of Psychophysiology Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Psychophysiology, 2020, 158, pp. 238-247,https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2020.10.005 en_US
dc.subject gratitude en_US
dc.subject psychological stress en_US
dc.subject stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity en_US
dc.subject stress buffering hypothesis en_US
dc.title State gratitude is associated with lower cardiovascular responses to acute psychological stress: a replication and extension en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2020.10.005
dc.date.embargoEndDate 2021-10-19
dc.embargo.terms 2021-10-19 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccess en_US


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