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Longitudinal associations between gait, falls and disability in community-dwelling older adults with type II diabetes mellitus: findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA)

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dc.contributor.author Donoghue, Orna A.
dc.contributor.author Leahy, Siobhan
dc.contributor.author Kenny, Rose Anne
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-16T14:54:46Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/9463
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description The full text of this article will not be available in ULIR until the embargo expires on the 15/04/2021
dc.description.abstract Background Diabetes is associated with gait deficits, future falls and disability, however it is unclear if associations remain after controlling for relevant confounders. This study investigated (i) the effects of type II diabetes on spatiotemporal gait parameters in community-dwelling older adults and (ii) if diabetes status was independently associated with future falls and disability, after controlling for gait and other confounders. Methods Baseline data were obtained from 2,608 community-dwelling adults (≥60 years) participating in The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). Diabetes was identified from self-reported doctors’ diagnosis, medications and glycated haemoglobin levels. Gait characteristics were obtained during single and dual task walking using a GAITRite® mat (n=2560). Incident falls and disability were collected over four years follow-up (n=2473). Associations between diabetes status and gait (cross-sectional) and falls and disability (longitudinal) were investigated using regression analysis, adjusting for medications, cardiovascular health, neuropsychological function and fall-related factors. Results Diabetes (prevalence = 9.1%) was cross-sectionally associated with shorter dual task step length after adjusting for covariates (β=-1.59, 95% CI: -3.10, -0.08, p<0.05). Diabetes was independently associated with increased risk of future IADL difficulty in those with no prior difficulty (IRR=1.51, 95% CI: 1.08 2.11, p<0.05) although dual task step length was an important confounder in all disability models. No independent associations between diabetes and falls were observed. Conclusions Diabetes was independently associated with shorter dual task step length and increased risk of future IADL difficulty. Multidimensional interventions addressing poor health and function in those with diabetes may help reduce the risk of gait deficits and future disability. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries The Journals of Gerontology: Series A;
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa263
dc.rights This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A following peer review. The version of record "Longitudinal associations between gait, falls and disability in community-dwelling older adults with type II diabetes mellitus: findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA)" is available online at:https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glaa263 en_US
dc.subject cardiovascular en_US
dc.subject frailty en_US
dc.subject functional performance en_US
dc.subject successful aging en_US
dc.title Longitudinal associations between gait, falls and disability in community-dwelling older adults with type II diabetes mellitus: findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/gerona/glaa263
dc.date.embargoEndDate 2021-04-15
dc.embargo.terms 2021-04-15 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccess en_US


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