University of Limerick Institutional Repository

Resistance exercise training for anxiety and worry symptoms among young adults: a randomized controlled trial

DSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Gordon, Brett R.
dc.contributor.author McDowell, Cillian P.
dc.contributor.author Lyons, Mark
dc.contributor.author Herring, Matthew P.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-20T09:41:57Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-20T09:41:57Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net.proxy.lib.ul.ie/10344/9346
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract This trial quantified the effects of ecologically-valid resistance exercise training (RET) on anxiety and worry symptoms among young adults. Young adults not meeting criteria for subclinical, or analogue Generalized Anxiety Disorder (AGAD) were randomized to an eight-week RET intervention, or eightweek wait-list. AGAD status was determined using validated cut-scores for both the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire-Generalized Anxiety Disorder subscale (≥ 6) and Penn State Worry Questionnaire (≥ 45). The primary outcome was anxiety symptoms measured with the Trait Anxiety subscale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The RET was designed according to World Health Organization and American College of Sports Medicine guidelines. RM-ANCOVA examined differences between RET and wait-list over time. Significant interactions were decomposed with simple effects analysis. analysis. Hedges’ d effect sizes quantified magnitude of differences in change between RET and wait-list. Twenty-eight participants (64% female) fully engaged in the trial (mean age: 26.0 ± 6.2y, RET: n = 14; Wait-list: n = 14). A significant group X time interaction was found for anxiety symptoms (F (3,66) = 3.60, p ≤ 0.019; d = 0.85, 95%CI: 0.06 to 1.63). RET significantly reduced anxiety symptoms from baseline to post-intervention (mean difference = − 7.89, p ≤ 0.001). No significant interaction was found for worry (F(3,69) = 0.79, p ≥ 0.50; d = − 0.22, 95%CI: − 0.96 to 0.53). Ecologically-valid RET significantly improves anxiety symptoms among young adults. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Springernature en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Scientific Reports;10,17548
dc.subject ecologically-valid en_US
dc.subject AGAD status en_US
dc.title Resistance exercise training for anxiety and worry symptoms among young adults: a randomized controlled trial en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41598-020-74608-6
dc.contributor.sponsor IRC en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ULIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics