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Examining what factors mediate treatment effect in chronic low back pain: a mediation analysis of a cognitive functional therapy clinical trial

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dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Aoife
dc.contributor.author O'Sullilvan, Kieran
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Peter B.
dc.contributor.author Purtill, Helen
dc.contributor.author O'Keeffe, Mary
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-31T13:09:38Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/9068
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description The full text of this article will not be available in ULIR until the embargo expires on the 28/06/2021
dc.description.abstract Cognitive Functional Therapy (CFT) is a physiotherapist-led individualised intervention for people with people with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP), involving biopsychosocial pain education, graded movement exposure and lifestyle coaching. A multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT), including 206 participants with CLBP in Ireland, supported CFT’s effectiveness for reducing disability, but not pain, compared to a group exercise and education intervention. In this study, causal mediation analysis was used to determine whether the effect of CFT on disability and the lack of effect on pain (relative to a group exercise and education intervention) is mediated by certain psychological and lifestyle factors. Hypothesised mediators measured were pain self-efficacy, stress, fear of physical activity, coping, depression, anxiety, and sleep, at 6 months. The outcomes measured were functional disability and pain intensity at 12 months. This causal mediation study shows that the majority of benefit of CFT (relative to a group exercise and education intervention) for disability is due to increasing pain self-efficacy. CFT did not improve the majority of the hypothesised mediators (stress, fear of physical activity, coping, depression, anxiety and sleep) and these mediators were not associated with either disability or pain. Unfortunately, the proportion of missing data in this study is substantial and these findings can only be considered hypothesis-generating. Therefore, future research should examine replicating the results of this study to verify the role of self-efficacy and other proposed mediators (e.g. stress, coping, sleep, fear) on clinical outcomes. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Wiley and Sons Ltd en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries European Journal of Pain;
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/EJP.1624
dc.rights This is the peer reviewed author version of the following article:Examining what factors mediate treatment effect in chronic low back pain: a mediation analysis of a cognitive functional therapy clinical trial which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/EJP.1624 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html#terms en_US
dc.subject cognitive functional therapy en_US
dc.subject mediation analysis en_US
dc.subject low back pain en_US
dc.subject randomised controlled trial en_US
dc.title Examining what factors mediate treatment effect in chronic low back pain: a mediation analysis of a cognitive functional therapy clinical trial en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/EJP.1624
dc.date.embargoEndDate 2021-06-28
dc.embargo.terms 2021-06-28 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccess en_US


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