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Kinematic and kinetic functional requirements for industrial exoskeletons for lifting tasks and overhead lifting

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dc.contributor.author Huysamen, Kirsten
dc.contributor.author Power, Valerie
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Leonard
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-27T08:56:23Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/9042
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description The full text of this article will not be available in ULIR until the embargo expires on the 19/05/2021
dc.description.abstract The aim of this study was to sample human kinematics and kinetics during simulated tasks to aid the design of industrial exoskeletons. Twelve participants performed two dynamic tasks; a simulated lifting task and an overhead lifting task. Based on the current data, to completely assist a worker with lifting loads up to 15 kg, hip actuators would need to supply up to 111 Nm of extensor torque at speeds up to 139°/s of extension velocity and 26°/s of flexion velocity. The actuators should allow the hip to extend to 11° and flex to 95°, and supply a power of 212 W. To completely assist workers lifting a 3 kg load overhead, actuators assisting shoulder flexion would need to supply up to 20 Nm of flexor torque at speeds up to 21°/s of extension velocity and 116°/s of flexion velocity. The actuators should also allow 67° of shoulder flexion and supply a power of 27 W. Practitioner summary: There is increasing interest in developing exoskeletons for industrial applications. This study details relevant kinetic and kinematic exposures for common production tasks, which can be used to inform functional requirements of industrial exoskeletons. Highlights This study sampled joint kinematic and kinetic activity to inform design of industrial exoskeletons. The study presents sample values to two types of common industrial tasks across the major joints as are often assisted. We also indicate considerations on which joints should be considered to be actively assisted. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Taylor and Francis en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Ergonomics;63 (7), pp. 818-830
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2020.1759698
dc.rights This is an Author's Manuscript of an article whose final and definitive form, the Version of Record, has been published in Ergonomics 2020 copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2020.1759698 en_US
dc.subject exoskeleton en_US
dc.subject assistive robotics en_US
dc.subject kinematic and kinetic en_US
dc.subject industrial tasks en_US
dc.title Kinematic and kinetic functional requirements for industrial exoskeletons for lifting tasks and overhead lifting en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/00140139.2020.1759698
dc.contributor.sponsor ERC en_US
dc.relation.projectid 608979 en_US
dc.date.embargoEndDate 2021-05-19
dc.embargo.terms 2021-05-19 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccess en_US


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