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Relationship between interface pressures and pneumatic cuff inflation pressure at different assessment sites of the lower limb to aid soft exoskeleton design

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dc.contributor.author Kermavnar, Tjaša
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Leonard
dc.contributor.author de Eyto, Adam
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-22T09:19:01Z
dc.date.available 2020-04-22T09:19:01Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.issn 0018-7208
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/8751
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Objective: The aim was to develop a means of predicting interface pressure from cuff inflation pressure during circumferential compression at the lower limb, in order to inform the design of soft exoskeletons. Background: Excessive mechanical loading of tissues can cause discomfort and soft tissue injury. Most ergonomic studies on exoskeletons are of interface pressure, but soft exoskeletons apply circumferential pressures similar to tourniquet cuffs by way of cuff inflation pressure. This study details the relationship between interface and cuff inflation pressures for pneumatic tourniquet cuffs. Method: Pneumatic cuffs of different widths were inflated to target pressures on (A) a rigid cylinder, (B) the dominant thigh and calf, and (C) knee of healthy participants standing still. Interface pressures were measured under the cuffs using a pressure-sensing mat. Average interface pressures were then compared to cuff inflation pressures. The influence of cuff width, cuff inflation pressure, and participantsâ anthropometric data on pressure transmission was assessed. Results: A strong linear relationship between cuff inflation pressures and interface pressures was observed. Interface pressures were generally higher than cuff inflation pressures. The efficiency of pressure transmission to the lower limb depended on assessment site, adipose tissue thickness, cuff size, cuff inflation pressure, and possibly limb circumference. Regression equations were developed to predict interface pressures at the thigh, calf, and knee. Conclusion: Interface pressures under pneumatic cuffs are influenced by the cuff size, cuff inflation pressure, and tissue compressibility. Predicted interface pressure from cuff inflation pressure and vice versa can be used to aid the design of soft exoskeletons. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher SAGE Publications en_US
dc.relation 688175 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Human Factors;
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0018720820908758
dc.subject cuff inflation pressure en_US
dc.subject interface pressure en_US
dc.subject pressure transmission efficiency en_US
dc.subject soft exoskeleton–human contact en_US
dc.title Relationship between interface pressures and pneumatic cuff inflation pressure at different assessment sites of the lower limb to aid soft exoskeleton design en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2020-04-22T09:11:39Z
dc.identifier.doi 10.1177/0018720820908758
dc.contributor.sponsor ERC en_US
dc.relation.projectid 688175 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 2949180
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.identifier.journaltitle Human factors
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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