University of Limerick Institutional Repository

Perceived social support mediates the association between attachment and cardiovascular reactivity in young adults

DSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author McMahon, Grace
dc.contributor.author Creaven, Ann-Marie
dc.contributor.author Gallagher, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-21T15:32:12Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation McMahon G.;Creaven A.;Gallagher S. (2019) 'Perceived social support mediates the association between attachment and cardiovascular reactivity in young adults'. Psychophysiology, . en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0048-5772
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/8256
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract To understand the influence of social relationships on cardiovascular responses to stress, the present study investigated perceived affectionate support as a mediating variable explaining the association between specific attachment bonds (i.e., mother, father, partner, best friend) and cardiovascular reactivity (CVR). Utilizing a standardized stress testing protocol, 138 young adults completed measures of attachment and social support, with continuous cardiovascular measurements obtained using the Finometer Pro hemodynamic monitor. Results showed that the association between anxious and avoidant attachment and reactivity were mediated by perceived affectionate support; insecure attachment was linked to lower levels of perceived social support, which in turn was associated with lower CVR. For anxious attachment, this was noted only for mothers (SBP: B = −0.94, 95% CI [−1.94, −0.20]; DBP: B = −0.57, [−1.27, −0.10]), fathers (SBP: B = −0.72, [−1.42, −0.17]; DBP: B = −0.48, [−1.01, −0.13]), and best friends (SBP: B = −0.64, [−1.23, −0.18]; DBP: B = −0.40, [−0.81, −0.12]). For avoidant attachment, it was evident only for fathers (SBP: B = −0.70, [−1.33, −0.17]; DBP: B = −0.48, [−0.92, −0.15]) and partners (SBP: B = −0.78, [−1.64, −0.09]; DBP: B = −0.53, [−1.10, −0.11]). These findings suggest that insecure attachment is associated with lower levels of reactivity, which have been linked to negative health outcomes such as poor self‐reported health, depression, and obesity. Overall, this research expands on the support and relationship science literature by incorporating under‐researched aspects of social relationships (i.e., specific attachment styles) and focusing on the mechanisms by which they are associated with physiological stress responses. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Wiley and Sons Ltd en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Psychophysiology; 57 (3), e13496
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.13496
dc.rights This is the author accepted peer reviewed version of the following article:Perceived social support mediates the association between attachment and cardiovascular reactivity in young adults, 2019 Psychophysiology which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.13496 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html#terms
dc.subject attachment en_US
dc.subject cardiovascular reactivity en_US
dc.subject perceived social support en_US
dc.subject stress en_US
dc.subject young adults en_US
dc.title Perceived social support mediates the association between attachment and cardiovascular reactivity in young adults en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2019-11-21T15:27:13Z
dc.description.version ACCEPTED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/psyp.13496
dc.date.embargoEndDate 2020-10-25
dc.embargo.terms 2020-10-25 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 2934097
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.identifier.journaltitle Psychophysiology
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ULIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics