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The effects of low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training on performance in competitive swimmers, with a specific focus on youth swimmers

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dc.contributor.advisor Warrington, Giles D.
dc.contributor.advisor Comyns, Thomas M.
dc.contributor.author Nugent, Frank J.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-28T14:48:48Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-28T14:48:48Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/7865
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract In recent years, the merits of low-volume, high-intensity training (HIT) programmes versus more traditional high-volume, low-intensity training (HVT) programmes has become a widely debated topic in competitive swimming. Aim: To investigate the effects HIT and HVT on performance in competitive swimmers. Methods: Study One involved a systematic review of the current literature to determine the effects of HIT on physiological and swimming performance in competitive swimmers. Study Two was a mixed methods study which explored expert swimming coaches’ perceptions of quality (i.e. HIT) and quantity (i.e. HVT) coaching philosophies. Study Three was an observational study which evaluated the effects of a 10 day period of HVT on competitive performance in youth swimmers. Study Four assessed the effects of a 7 week HIT intervention on performance parameters in competitive youth swimmers. Results: Study One identified 7 studies that were eligible for review. Six out of the 7 studies found HIT resulted in significant improvements in physiological performance. Four of the 7 studies found that HIT resulted in significant improvements in swimming performance. Study Two suggests expert swimming coaches felt quality programmes lead to short term results for youth swimmers however quantity programmes build an aerobic base, promote technical development and help to enhance recovery. Study Three found that competitive performance increased by 7.1% from pre-camp to post-camp (p = 0.001, dz = 1.6). Study Four found that a 7 week HIT intervention was neither beneficial nor detrimental to performance parameters. Conclusion: Study One suggests the effects of HIT on performance are promising as the majority of studies either maintained or improved performance. However, the expert swimming coaches in Study Two advised against quality (i.e. HIT) programmes for youth swimmers. Study Three suggests that a 10 day period of HVT may improve competitive performance in youth swimmers. Study Four suggests that a 7 week HIT intervention was neither beneficial nor detrimental to performance parameters. Future studies should be ≥ 12 weeks duration with larger sample sizes and should investigate the effect of HIT and HVT on similar performance parameters. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher University of Limerick en_US
dc.subject youth swimmers en_US
dc.subject intensity training en_US
dc.subject performance en_US
dc.title The effects of low-volume, high-intensity training versus high-volume, low-intensity training on performance in competitive swimmers, with a specific focus on youth swimmers en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/doctoralThesis en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_theses_dissertations en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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