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Age-group differences in the performance of selected tests of physical function and association with lower extremity strength

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dc.contributor.author Francis, Peter
dc.contributor.author McCormack, William
dc.contributor.author Lyons, Mark
dc.contributor.author Jakeman, Philip M.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-29T09:14:22Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-29T09:14:22Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.issn 1539-8412
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/7793
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract . Background and Purpose: It is not known whether short functional performance tests used in aging research are appropriate for use in healthy older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate age-group differences (sixth decade vs seventh decade) in selected functional performance tests and the association between lower extremity strength and functional performance. Methods: One hundred fifty-nine (18.2% [n = 29] male) healthy older adults (mean (standard deviation) age 60.4 (5.3) years), adults were recruited from the University of Limerick Campus Community. Knee extensor (KE) peak torque (PT) was assessed from a maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Subsequently, participants completed 10-m maximal and habitual gait speed tests, 5 repetition and 30-second chair rise tests, and a 900-m gait speed test. Results and Discussion: There was no difference in 10-m gait speed between those in the sixth and seventh decades (P > .05). Compared with the sixth decade, those in the seventh decade required an extra 39 seconds to complete 900 m, an extra 0.6 seconds to complete 5 chair rises and performed 2 fewer chair rises in a 30-second time period (P < .05). All tests had a weak association with KE strength (r = 0.226-0.360; P < .05), except for 900-m gait speed that had a moderate association (r = −0.537; P < .001). Our findings suggest that gait speed tests of 10 m or less cannot detect age-related difference in functional capacity when used in healthy older adults. Conclusion: Extended physical performance tests should be used in aging research on healthy older adults. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journalof Geriatric Physical Therapy;42 (1), pp. 1-18
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1519/JPT.0000000000000152
dc.rights This is the author's accepted version of "Age-Group Differences in the Performance of Selected Tests of Physical Function and Association With Lower Extremity Strength" published in Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy 42(1):1–8, JAN 2019 © 2019 Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. The final published version can be found at en_US
dc.subject ADL en_US
dc.subject knee extensor en_US
dc.subject strength en_US
dc.subject ageing en_US
dc.title Age-group differences in the performance of selected tests of physical function and association with lower extremity strength en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2019-04-29T09:05:54Z
dc.description.version ACCEPTED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1519/JPT.0000000000000152
dc.contributor.sponsor Road-bridge Medical Research Scholarship en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor Food for Health Ireland en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor EI en_US
dc.relation.projectid CC20080001 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 2871151
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal Of Geriatric Physical Therapy
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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