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Sex differences in the temporal recovery of neuromuscular function following resistance training in resistance trained men and women 18 to 35 Years

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dc.contributor.author Davies, Robert W.
dc.contributor.author Carson, Brian P.
dc.contributor.author Jakeman, Philip M.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-16T15:43:16Z
dc.date.available 2018-11-16T15:43:16Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/7322
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract To investigate sex differences in the temporal recovery of neuromuscular function following resistance training (RT), eleven men and eight women 18–35 years completed a single RT bout (barbell back-squats, 80 % 1RM, 5 sets × 5 reps, 25 % duty cycle, then 1 set × max reps). Measures of muscle function (isometric, concentric, eccentric knee extensor strength, and countermovement jump (CMJ) height), serum creatine kinase activity (CK) and lower-body muscle pain were assessed before RT (0 h), +4 h, +24 h, +48 h, and +72 h post-RT. Data are mean % change from PRE (SD) and effect size (ω2, d). Men and women had similar RT-experience (men, 2.1 (0.8) years vs. women 2.4 (1.0) years, P = 0.746, and d = 0.3) and 1RM strength per kg lean mass (men, 1.9 (0.2) kg⋅kg-1 vs. women, 1.8 (0.3) kg⋅kg-1, P = 0.303, and d = 0.3). A 36 (12)% increase in lower-body muscle pain was reported following RT (P < 0.05, d > 0.9). There was an absence of any overt change in CK [+24 h, 74 (41) IU⋅L-1; pooled mean (SD)]. Decrements in knee extensor strength and CMJ height were observed +4 to +72 h for both men and women (P < 0.05, ω2 = 0.19–0.69). Sex differences were apparent for CMJ height (+24 h men, -10 (6)% vs. women, -20 (11)%, P < 0.001, and d = 1.8) and isokinetic concentric strength (+24 h men, -10 (13)% vs. women -25 (14)%, P = 0.006, and d = 1.8), with a more pronounced loss and prolonged recovery in women compared to men (e.g., CMJ + 72 h men, -3 (6)% vs. women, -13 (12)%, P = 0.051, and d = 1.1). We conclude that the different temporal recovery patterns between men and women are not explicable by differences in muscle strength, RT performance, experience, muscle damage or fatigability. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en_US
dc.relation TC20130001 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Frontiers in Physiology;9, article 1480
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.01480
dc.rights First published by Frontiers Media in Frontiers in Physiology, 2018, 9, article 1480 en_US
dc.subject exercise en_US
dc.subject fatigue en_US
dc.subject performance en_US
dc.subject recovery en_US
dc.subject sex characteristics en_US
dc.subject strength en_US
dc.title Sex differences in the temporal recovery of neuromuscular function following resistance training in resistance trained men and women 18 to 35 Years en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fphys.2018.01480
dc.contributor.sponsor Food for Health Ireland en_US
dc.relation.projectid TC20130001 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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