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Using the five domains model to assess the adverse impacts of husbandry, veterinary, and equitation interventions on horse welfare

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dc.contributor.author McGreevy, Paul
dc.contributor.author Berger, Jeannine
dc.contributor.author de Brauwere, Nic
dc.contributor.author Doherty, Orla M.
dc.contributor.author Harrison, Anna
dc.contributor.author Fiedler, Julie
dc.contributor.author Jones, Claudia
dc.contributor.author McDonnell, Sue
dc.contributor.author McLean, Andrew
dc.contributor.author Nakonechny, Lindsay
dc.contributor.author Nicol, Christine
dc.contributor.author Preshaw, Liane
dc.contributor.author Thomson, Peter
dc.contributor.author Tzioumis, Vicky
dc.contributor.author Webster, John
dc.contributor.author Wolfensohn, Sarah
dc.contributor.author Yeates, James
dc.contributor.author Jones, Bidda
dc.date.accessioned 2018-04-03T09:26:30Z
dc.date.available 2018-04-03T09:26:30Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/6697
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract The aim of this study was to conduct a series of paper-based exercises in order to assess the negative (adverse) welfare impacts, if any, of common interventions on domestic horses across a broad range of different contexts of equine care and training. An international panel (with professional expertise in psychology, equitation science, veterinary science, education, welfare, equestrian coaching, advocacy, and community engagement; n = 16) met over a four-day period to define and assess these interventions, using an adaptation of the domain-based assessment model. The interventions were considered within 14 contexts: C1Weaning; C2 Diet; C3 Housing; C4 Foundation training; C5 Ill-health and veterinary interventions (chiefly medical); C6 Ill-health and veterinary interventions (chiefly surgical); C7 Elective procedures; C8 Care procedures; C9 Restraint for management procedures; C10 Road transport; C11 Activity—competition; C12 Activity—work; C13 Activity—breeding females; and C14 Activity—breeding males. Scores on a 1–10 scale for Domain 5 (the mental domain) gathered during the workshop were compared with overall impact scores on a 1–10 scale assigned by the same panellists individually before the workshop. The most severe (median and interquartile range, IQR) impacts within each context were identified during the workshop as: C1 abrupt, individual weaning (10 IQR 1); C2 feeding 100% low-energy concentrate (8 IQR 2.5); C3 indoor tie stalls with no social contact (9 IQR 1.5); C4 both (i) dropping horse with ropes (9 IQR 0.5) and forced flexion (9 IQR 0.5); C5 long-term curative medical treatments (8 IQR 3); C6 major deep intracavity surgery (8.5 IQR 1); C7 castration without veterinary supervision (10 IQR 1); C8 both (i) tongue ties (8 IQR 2.5) and (ii) restrictive nosebands (8 IQR 2.5); C9 ear twitch (8 IQR 1); C10 both (i) individual transport (7.00 IQR 1.5) and group transport with unfamiliar companions (7 IQR 1.5); C11 both (i) jumps racing (8 IQR 2.5) and Western performance (8 IQR 1.5); C12 carriage and haulage work (6 IQR 1.5); C13 wet nurse during transition between foals (7.5 IQR 3.75); and C14 teaser horse (7 IQR 8). Associations between pre-workshop and workshop scores were high, but some rankings changed after workshop participation, particularly relating to breeding practices. Domain 1 had the weakest association with Domain 5. The current article discusses the use of the domain-based model in equine welfare assessment, and offers a series of assumptions within each context that future users of the same approach may make when assessing animal welfare under the categories reported here. It also discusses some limitations in the framework that was used to apply the model. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher MDPI en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Animals;8, 41
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani8030041
dc.subject horse en_US
dc.subject welfare assessment en_US
dc.subject equitation en_US
dc.subject husbandry en_US
dc.subject five domains en_US
dc.title Using the five domains model to assess the adverse impacts of husbandry, veterinary, and equitation interventions on horse welfare en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.3390/ani8030041
dc.contributor.sponsor The Dorothy Russell Havemeyer Foundation en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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