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Antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) in primary care; what factors affect prescribing and why is it important? A narrative review

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dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Ray
dc.contributor.author O'Doherty, Jane
dc.contributor.author O'Regan, Andrew
dc.contributor.author Dunne, Colum P.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-21T10:09:54Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-21T10:09:54Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/6666
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging global threat to health and is associated with increased consumption of antibiotics. Seventy-four per cent of antibiotic prescribing takes place in primary care. Much of this is for inappropriate treatment of acute respiratory tract infections. Aims To review the published literature pertaining to antibiotic prescribing in order to identify and understand the factors that affect primary care providers’ prescribing decisions. Methods Six online databases were searched for relevant paper using agreed criteria. One hundred ninety-five papers were retrieved, and 139 were included in this review. Results Primary care providers are highly influenced to prescribe by patient expectation for antibiotics, clinical uncertainty and workload induced time pressures. Strategies proven to reduce such inappropriate prescribing include appropriately aimed multifaceted educational interventions for primary care providers, mass media educational campaigns aimed at healthcare professionals and the public, use of good communication skills in the consultation, use of delayed prescriptions especially when accompanied by written information, point of care testing and, probably, longer less pressurised consultations. Delayed prescriptions also facilitate focused personalised patient education. Conclusion There is an emerging consensus in the literature regarding strategies proven to reduce antibiotic consumption for acute respiratory tract infections. The widespread adoption of these strategies in primary care is imperative. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Springer Verlag en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Irish Journal of Medical Science;February 2018
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1007/s11845-018-1774-5
dc.subject adult or paediatric en_US
dc.subject antibacterial agent en_US
dc.subject antibiotic prescription en_US
dc.subject patient expectations en_US
dc.subject upper respiratory tract infection en_US
dc.title Antibiotic use for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) in primary care; what factors affect prescribing and why is it important? A narrative review en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s11845-018-1774-5
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 2738358


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