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Identified mental disorders in older adults in primary care: a cross-sectional database study

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dc.contributor.author McCombe, Geoff
dc.contributor.author Fogarty, Frank
dc.contributor.author Swan, Davina
dc.contributor.author Hannigan, Ailish
dc.contributor.author Fealy, Gerard M.
dc.contributor.author Kyne, Lorraine
dc.contributor.author Meagher, David
dc.contributor.author Cullen, Walter
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-16T11:47:08Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-16T11:47:08Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/6566
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Introduction: Identifying and managing mental disorders among older adults is an important challenge for primary care in Europe. Electronic medical records (EMRs) offer considerable potential in this regard, although there is a paucity of data on their use for this purpose. Objectives: To examine the prevalence/treatment of identified mental disorders among older adults (over 55 years) by using data derived from EMRs in general practice. Methods: We utilized data from a cross-sectional study of mental disorders in primary care, which identified patients with mental disorders based on diagnostic coding and prescribed medicines. We collected anonymized data from 35 practices nationally from June 2014 to March 2015, and secondary analysis of this dataset examined the prevalence of mental disorders in adults aged over 55 years. Results: 74,261 patients aged over 55 years were identified, of whom 14,143 had a mental health disorder (prevalence rate of 19.1%). There was considerable variation between practices (range: 3.7–38.9%), with a median prevalence of 23.1%. Prevalence increased with age, from 14.8% at 55–59 years to 28.9% at 80–84 years. Most common disorders were depression (17.1%), panic/anxiety (11.3%), cognitive (5.6%), alcohol (3.8%) and substance use (3.8%). Conclusions: Examining mental disorders among older adults using data derived from EMRs is feasible. Mental disorders are common among older adults attending primary care and this study demonstrates the utility of electronic medical records in epidemiological studies of large populations in primary care. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries European Journal of General Practice;24 (1), pp. 84–91
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1080/13814788.2017.1402884
dc.subject mental disorders en_US
dc.subject electronic medical records en_US
dc.subject general practice en_US
dc.subject primary healthcare en_US
dc.subject prevalence en_US
dc.subject treatment en_US
dc.title Identified mental disorders in older adults in primary care: a cross-sectional database study en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/13814788.2017.1402884
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 2737533


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