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GPs' and community pharmacists' opinions on medication management at transitions of care in Ireland

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dc.contributor.author Redmond, P.
dc.contributor.author Carroll, H.
dc.contributor.author Grimes, T.
dc.contributor.author Galvin, Rose
dc.contributor.author McDonnell, Ronan
dc.contributor.author Boland, Fiona
dc.contributor.author McDowell, R.
dc.contributor.author Hughes, C.
dc.contributor.author Fahey, Tom
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-07T15:07:00Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-07T15:07:00Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.issn 1460-2229 (Electronic)02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/6326
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to survey GPs and community pharmacists (CPs) in Ireland regarding current practices of medication management, specifically medication reconciliation, communication between health care providers and medication errors as patients transition in care. METHODS: A national cross-sectional survey was distributed electronically to 2364 GPs, 311 GP Registrars and 2382 CPs. Multivariable associations comparing GPs to CPs were generated and content analysis of free text responses was undertaken. RESULTS: There was an overall response rate of 17.7% (897 respondents-554 GPs/Registrars and 343 CPs). More than 90% of GPs and CPs were positive about the effects of medication reconciliation on medication safety and adherence. Sixty per cent of GPs reported having no formal system of medication reconciliation. Communication between GPs and CPs was identified as good/very good by >90% of GPs and CPs. The majority (>80%) of both groups could clearly recall prescribing errors, following a transition of care, they had witnessed in the previous 6 months. Free text content analysis corroborated the positive relationship between GPs and CPs, a frustration with secondary care communication, with many examples given of prescribing errors. CONCLUSIONS: While there is enthusiasm for the benefits of medication reconciliation there are limited formal structures in primary care to support it. Challenges in relation to systems that support inter-professional communication and reduce medication errors are features of the primary/secondary care transition. There is a need for an improved medication management system. Future research should focus on the identified barriers in implementing medication reconciliation and systems that can improve it.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to survey GPs and community pharmacists (CPs) in Ireland regarding current practices of medication management, specifically medication reconciliation, communication between health care providers and medication errors as patients transition in care. METHODS: A national cross-sectional survey was distributed electronically to 2364 GPs, 311 GP Registrars and 2382 CPs. Multivariable associations comparing GPs to CPs were generated and content analysis of free text responses was undertaken. RESULTS: There was an overall response rate of 17.7% (897 respondents-554 GPs/Registrars and 343 CPs). More than 90% of GPs and CPs were positive about the effects of medication reconciliation on medication safety and adherence. Sixty per cent of GPs reported having no formal system of medication reconciliation. Communication between GPs and CPs was identified as good/very good by >90% of GPs and CPs. The majority (>80%) of both groups could clearly recall prescribing errors, following a transition of care, they had witnessed in the previous 6 months. Free text content analysis corroborated the positive relationship between GPs and CPs, a frustration with secondary care communication, with many examples given of prescribing errors. CONCLUSIONS: While there is enthusiasm for the benefits of medication reconciliation there are limited formal structures in primary care to support it. Challenges in relation to systems that support inter-professional communication and reduce medication errors are features of the primary/secondary care transition. There is a need for an improved medication management system. Future research should focus on the identified barriers in implementing medication reconciliation and systems that can improve it. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Family Practice;33 (2), pp. 172-8
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmw006
dc.rights This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced PDF of "GPs' and community pharmacists' opinions on medication management at transitions of care in Ireland" accepted for publication in Family Practice, 2016, 33 (2), pp. 172-8 following peer review. The version of record is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmw006 en_US
dc.subject medical errors/patient safety en_US
dc.subject medication reconciliation en_US
dc.subject pharmacology/drug reactions en_US
dc.subject primary care en_US
dc.subject quality of care. en_US
dc.subject continuity of care en_US
dc.title GPs' and community pharmacists' opinions on medication management at transitions of care in Ireland en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2017-12-07T14:47:54Z
dc.description.version ACCEPTED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/fampra/cmw006
dc.contributor.sponsor HRB en_US
dc.relation.projectid HRC/2007/1 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 1632051
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.identifier.journaltitle Family Practice
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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