University of Limerick Institutional Repository

Post-traumatic growth following acquired brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis

DSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Grace, Jenny J.
dc.contributor.author Kinsella, Elaine Louise
dc.contributor.author Muldoon, Orla T.
dc.contributor.author Fortune, Dónal G.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-23T10:37:36Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-23T10:37:36Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/6294
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract The idea that acquired brain injury (ABI) caused by stroke, hemorrhage, infection or traumatic insult to the brain can result in post-traumatic growth (PTG) for individuals is increasingly attracting psychological attention. However, PTG also attracts controversy as a result of ambiguous empirical findings. The extent that demographic variables, injury factors, subjective beliefs, and psychological health are associated with PTG following ABI is not clear. Consequently, this systematic review and meta-analysis explores the correlates of variables within these four broad areas and PTG. From a total of 744 published studies addressing PTG in people with ABI, eight studies met inclusion criteria for detailed examination. Meta-analysis of these studies indicated that growth was related to employment, longer education, subjective beliefs about change post-injury, relationship status, older age, longer time since injury, and lower levels of depression. Results from homogeneity analyses indicated significant inter-study heterogeneity across variables. There is general support for the idea that people with ABI can experience growth, and that various demographics, injury-related variables, subjective beliefs and psychological health are related to growth. The contribution of social integration and the forming of new identities post-ABI to the experience of PTG is explored. These meta-analytic findings are however constrained by methodological limitations prevalent in the literature. Clinical and research implications are discussed with specific reference to community and collective factors that enable PTG. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Frontiers in Psychology;6:1162
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01162
dc.rights This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission. en_US
dc.subject brain injury en_US
dc.subject head injury en_US
dc.subject trauma en_US
dc.subject post-traumatic growth en_US
dc.subject rehabilitation outcomes en_US
dc.title Post-traumatic growth following acquired brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01162
dc.contributor.sponsor IRC en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor Acquired Brain Injury Ireland en_US
dc.relation.projectid EPSPD/2013/691 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ULIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics