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Cellular zinc homeostasis contributes to neuronal differentiation in human induced pluripotent stem cells

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dc.contributor.author Pfaender, Stefanie
dc.contributor.author Föhr, Karl
dc.contributor.author Lutz, Anne-Kathrin
dc.contributor.author Putz, Stefan
dc.contributor.author Achberger, Kevin
dc.contributor.author Linta, Leonhard
dc.contributor.author Liebau, Stefan
dc.contributor.author Boeckers, Tobias M.
dc.contributor.author Grabrucker, Andreas M.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-29T08:48:46Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-29T08:48:46Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/6035
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Disturbances in neuronal differentiation and function are an underlying factor of many brain disorders. Zinc homeostasis and signaling are important mediators for a normal brain development and function, given that zinc deficiency was shown to result in cognitive and emotional deficits in animal models that might be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. One underlying mechanism of the observed detrimental effects of zinc deficiency on the brain might be impaired proliferation and differentiation of stem cells participating in neurogenesis. Thus, to examine the molecular mechanisms regulating zinc metabolism and signaling in differentiating neurons, using a protocol for motor neuron differentiation, we characterized the expression of zinc homeostasis genes during neurogenesis using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and evaluated the influence of altered zinc levels on the expression of zinc homeostasis genes, cell survival, cell fate, and neuronal function. Our results show that zinc transporters are highly regulated genes during neuronal differentiation and that low zinc levels are associated with decreased cell survival, altered neuronal differentiation, and, in particular, synaptic function. We conclude that zinc deficiency in a critical time window during brain development might influence brain function by modulating neuronal differentiation. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Neural Plasticity;article ID 3760702
dc.subject brain disorders en_US
dc.title Cellular zinc homeostasis contributes to neuronal differentiation in human induced pluripotent stem cells en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2017-08-29T08:41:02Z
dc.description.version PUBLISHED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1155/2016/3760702
dc.contributor.sponsor ERC
dc.relation.projectid 115300
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 2701166
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.identifier.journaltitle Neural plasticity
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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