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'The more we stand for-the more we fight for': compatibility and legitimacy in the effects of multiple social identities

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dc.contributor.author Chayinska, Maria
dc.contributor.author Minescu, Anca
dc.contributor.author McCarty, Graig
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-22T15:06:05Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-22T15:06:05Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/5812
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract This paper explores the expression of multiple social identities through coordinated collective action. We propose that perceived compatibility between potentially contrasting identities and perceived legitimacy of protest serve as catalysts for collective action. The present paper maps the context of the “Euromaidan” anti-regime protests in Ukraine and reports data (N = 996) collected through an online survey following legislation to ban protests (March–May, 2014). We measured participants’ identification with three different groups (the Ukrainian nation, the online protest community, and the street movement), perception of compatibility between online protest and the street movement, perception of the legitimacy of protest, and intentions to take persuasive and confrontational collective action. We found evidence that the more social groups people “stood for,” the more they “fought” for their cause and that identifications predicted both forms of collective action to the degree that people saw the protest and the online movement as compatible with each other and believed protest to be legitimate. Collective action can be interpreted as the congruent expression of multiple identities that are rendered ideologically compatible both in online settings and on the street. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Frontiers in Psychology;8, Article 642
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00642
dc.rights This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission en_US
dc.subject multiple social identities en_US
dc.subject perceived compatibility en_US
dc.subject perceived compatibility en_US
dc.subject perceived legitimacy of protest en_US
dc.subject collective action en_US
dc.subject political activism en_US
dc.title 'The more we stand for-the more we fight for': compatibility and legitimacy in the effects of multiple social identities en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00642
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 2712239


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