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Exposure to domestic violence and abuse: evidence of distinct physical and psychological dimensions

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dc.contributor.author Naughton, Catherine M.
dc.contributor.author O'Donnell, Aisling T.
dc.contributor.author Muldoon, Orla T.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-09T13:42:20Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-09T13:42:20Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.other 10.1177/0886260517706763
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/5787
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Recent literature on exposure to domestic violence highlights the need for increased understanding of the dynamics of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). The current aims were to explore whether two separate dimensions, physical and psychological DVA, were evident in adult children’s reports of their exposure to DVA in their family of origin and whether these dimensions impacted psychological wellbeing and perceived satisfaction with emotional support (hereafter referred to as social support satisfaction). Young adults (N = 465, aged 17 to 25, 70% female) reported their experiences of DVA as perpetrated by their parents/caregivers, as well as psychological wellbeing and social support satisfaction, in an online survey. Using confirmatory factor analysis we verified the presence of a 2-factor (physical and psychological DVA) model. Hierarchical linear regression analysis demonstrated the differing impact of these two factors: specifically, while exposure to psychological DVA (DA) was related to reduced psychological wellbeing, there was no significant effect of exposure to physical DVA (DV). However, mediation analysis suggested the presence of a suppression effect; there was a magnification of the negative relationship between exposure to psychological DA and social support satisfaction when exposure to physical DV was accounted for. Although findings are preliminary, they provide strong evidence to support theoretical arguments regarding the need for future research to conceptualize exposure to DVA in terms of both physical and psychological dimensions. Our findings also highlight that in order to improve service response and provide effective interventions, it is essential to include exposure to psychological DA in risk assessments of such young adults. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Journal of Interpersonal Violence en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of Interpersonal Violence;pp. 1-22
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260517706763
dc.rights This is the author accepted version of an article that was published by SAGE Publications in Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 2017, pp. 1-22, en_US
dc.subject child exposure to domestic violence en_US
dc.subject intimate partner violence en_US
dc.subject young adults en_US
dc.subject psychological DA en_US
dc.subject physical DV en_US
dc.title Exposure to domestic violence and abuse: evidence of distinct physical and psychological dimensions en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 2735782


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