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Estimating upper limb discomfort level due to intermittent isometric pronation torque with various combinations of elbow angles, forearm rotation angles, force and frequency with upper arm at 90 degrees abduction

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dc.contributor.author Mukhopadhyay, Prabir
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Leonard
dc.contributor.author Gallwey, Timothy J.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-12T06:50:14Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-12T06:50:14Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.issn 0169-8141
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/5694
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Industrial jobs involving upper arm abduction have a strong association with musculoskeletal disorders and injury. But there is still paucity of data on the different risk factors that are responsible for the genesis of such disorders or injuries. The current laboratory study is an attempt in that direction. Thirty-six right-handed male university students participated in a full factorial model of three forearm rotation angles (60% prone and supine and neutral range of motion), three elbow angles (45 degrees, 90 degrees and 135 degrees), two exertion frequencies (10 and 20/min) and two levels of pronation torque (10% and 20% MVC). Discomfort rating after each five-minute treatment was recorded on a visual analogue scale. Repeated measures ANCOVA with grip endurance time as a covariate indicated that forearm rotation angle (p = 0.001), elbow flexion angle (p = 0.016), MVC torque (p = 0.001) and frequency (p = 0.049) were significant. Grip endurance time was not significant (p = 0.74). EMG activity of the Pronator Teres (PT) and the Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis (ECRB) revealed that both muscles were affected by forearm rotation and level of MVC torque. A supplementary experiment in which MVC pronation torque at different articulations was measured showed that some of the increased discomfort appeared to be due to increased relative NIVC at some of the extreme articulations. The findings indicated that, with the upper arm in abduction, an elbow angle of 45 degrees and forearm prone, are a posture vulnerable to injury and should be avoided. Grip endurance time as a covariate warrants further investigation. Relevance to industry There is still a paucity of data on risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders for upper arm articulations typical of industrial jobs, especially postures involving upper arm abduction. Industrial jobs involving upper arm abduction have a strong association with injury as operators must often maintain static upper arm abduction while performing tasks for long durations. This study presents discomfort and pronation torque MVC data at different upper arm articulations to identify and control high-risk tasks in industry well before they develop into Musculoskeletal Disorders, especially at the design stage when using biomechanical models. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics;37 (4), pp. 313-325
dc.relation.uri http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ergon.2006.11.007
dc.rights This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication In International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 2007, 37 (4), pp. 313-325 http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ergon.2006.11.007 en_US
dc.subject upper arm abduction en_US
dc.subject pronation torque en_US
dc.subject musculoskeletal disorder en_US
dc.subject discomfort score en_US
dc.title Estimating upper limb discomfort level due to intermittent isometric pronation torque with various combinations of elbow angles, forearm rotation angles, force and frequency with upper arm at 90 degrees abduction en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2017-04-12T06:44:41Z
dc.description.version ACCEPTED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.ergon.2006.11.007
dc.contributor.sponsor European Commission en_US
dc.relation.projectid GIRTH-CT-2001-005740 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 1135217
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.identifier.journaltitle International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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