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Employee voice and silence in auditing firms

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dc.contributor.author Donovan, Sean
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Michelle
dc.contributor.author Doyle, Elaine
dc.contributor.author Garvey, John
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-30T08:01:20Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-30T08:01:20Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/5647
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract                            Purpose: This paper presents an exploratory study of speaking up in international auditing firms. We examine two key questions: (i) what is the propensity of employees in training to speak up on workplace problems and (ii) how would management react to employees in training speaking up on workplace problems? Design: We compare and contrast the views of employees on training contracts with management, including partners. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 8 managers/partners and 20 employees working in 6 large auditing firms in Ireland. Findings: We find that employees on training contracts have a high propensity to remain silent on workplace problems.  Quiescent and acquiescent forms of silence were evident. Management expressed willingness to act on employee voice on workplace problems concerning business improvements and employee performance but were very resistant to voice in regard to a change in working conditions or a managers performance. Employees and management couched employee voice in terms of technical knowledge exchange rather than being associated with employee dissatisfaction or having a say in decision making. Originality: We highlight how new professional employees are socialised into understanding that employee voice is not a democratic right and the paper provides insight on the important role of partners as owner/managers in perpetuating employee silence. Previous research on owner/managers has tended to focus on small businesses while the auditing firms in this study have large numbers of employees. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Employee Relations;38 (4), pp. 563-577
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/ER-05-2015-0078
dc.rights This article is (c) Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here http://ulir.ul.ie. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald en_US
dc.subject employee voice en_US
dc.subject management attitudes en_US
dc.subject auditing firms en_US
dc.subject employee silence en_US
dc.subject trainees en_US
dc.title Employee voice and silence in auditing firms en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2017-03-29T09:02:02Z
dc.description.version ACCEPTED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1108/ER-05-2015-0078
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 1633871
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.identifier.journaltitle Employee Relations
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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