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Involving migrants in the development of guidelines for communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations: a participatory learning and action research project

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dc.contributor.author O'Reilly-de Brún, Mary
dc.contributor.author MacFarlane, Anne E.
dc.contributor.author de Brún, Tomas
dc.contributor.author Okonkwo, Ekaterina
dc.contributor.author Bokanga, Jean Samuel Bonsenge
dc.contributor.author De Almeida Silva, Maria Manuela
dc.contributor.author Ogbebor, Florence
dc.contributor.author Mierzejewska, Aga
dc.contributor.author Nnadi, Lovina
dc.contributor.author van den Muijsenbergh, Maria
dc.contributor.author van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn
dc.contributor.author van Weel, Chris
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-04T11:07:15Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-04T11:07:15Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/5138
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Objective: The aim of this research was to involve migrants and other key stakeholders in a participatory dialogue to develop a guideline for enhancing communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations. In this paper, we focus on findings about the use of formal versus informal interpreters because dialogues about these issues emerged as central to the identification of recommendations for best practice.Design: This qualitative case study involved a Participatory Learning and Action (PLA) research methodology.Participants: The sample comprised 80 stakeholders: 51 from migrant communities; 15 general practitioners (GPs) and general practice staff; 7 established migrants as peer researchers; 5 formal, trained interpreters; and 2 service planners from the national health authority.Setting: Galway, Ireland.Results: There was 100% consensus across stakeholder groups that while informal interpreters have uses for migrants and general practice staff, they are not considered acceptable as best practice. There was also 100% consensus that formal interpreters who are trained and working as per a professional code of practice are acceptable as best practice.Conclusions: Policymakers and service planners need to work in partnership with service providers and migrants to progress the implementation of professional, trained interpreters as a routine way of working in general practice. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher BMJ Publishing Group en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries BMJ Open;5, e007092
dc.subject primary health care en_US
dc.subject language barriers en_US
dc.subject interpreted consultations en_US
dc.subject asylum seekers en_US
dc.subject experiences en_US
dc.subject responses en_US
dc.title Involving migrants in the development of guidelines for communication in cross-cultural general practice consultations: a participatory learning and action research project en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2016-08-04T10:52:54Z
dc.description.version PUBLISHED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007092
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 1617573
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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