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A dual step transfer model: sport and non-sport extracurricular activities and the enhancement of academic achievement

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dc.contributor.author Bradley, John L.
dc.contributor.author Conway, Paul F.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-05T10:48:34Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Bradley, J., Conway, P. F. (2016) 'A dual step transfer model: Sport and non-sport extracurricular activities and the enhancement of academic achievement'. British Educational Research Journal, . en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/5043
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract This paper explores the influence that school sport and non-sport extracurricular activities (sEC and nsEC) can have on academic achievement. A central thesis of this paper is that, despite the literature on the perceived and presumed benefits of school sport and of non-sport activities, theorising a model of the process by which the benefit is attained, which we conceptualise as a case of transfer, has been neglected. Cognisant of the long-standing literature on transfer and the recent resurgence in transfer research, we present a dual step transfer hypothesis by which ssEC and sEC activities confer academic achievement benefits. Key to this dual step transfer hypothesis is the influence these activities have on non-cognitive skills, whereby the activity promotes non-cognitive skills (i.e., motivational-social skills), which in turn promote learning and academic achievement. We present an overview of transfer from the early discussions framing transfer to either mental muscle or identical elements mechanisms, to more recent discussions and new perspectives on what counts as transfer. To this discussion we compare research linking academic achievement to school physical education, school sport and school non-sport activities. We place particular emphasis on extracurricular activities and the potential influence they can have on non-cognitive characteristics. In making our argument we weigh up the relative support for dual step transfer within extant literature on both areas, and in doing so return to take a position on the long-standing and divergent framing of transfer in terms of either mental muscle or identical elements mechanisms. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Wiley en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries British Educational Research Journal;42 (4), pp. 703-728
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/berj.3232
dc.rights This is the author's version of the following article:A dual step transfer model: sport and non-sport extracurricular activities and the enhancement of academic achievement The definitive version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/berj.3232 en_US
dc.subject academic achievement en_US
dc.subject dual step transfer en_US
dc.subject extracurricular en_US
dc.subject sport and non-sport en_US
dc.subject activities en_US
dc.title A dual step transfer model: sport and non-sport extracurricular activities and the enhancement of academic achievement en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2016-05-05T10:43:34Z
dc.description.version ACCEPTED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/berj.3232
dc.date.embargoEndDate 2018-04-26
dc.embargo.terms 2018-04-26 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 1631851
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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