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Sarcopenia, dynapenia, and the impact of advancing age on human skeletal muscle size and strength; a quantitative review

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dc.contributor.author Mitchell, W Kyle
dc.contributor.author Williams, John
dc.contributor.author Atherton, Philip J
dc.contributor.author Larvin, Michael
dc.contributor.author Lund, John
dc.contributor.author Narici, Marco
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-19T14:15:24Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-19T14:15:24Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/5024
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Changing demographics make it ever more important to understand the modifiable risk factors for disability and loss of independence with advancing age. For more than two decades there has been increasing interest in the role of sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle or lean mass, in curtailing active and healthy aging. There is now evidence to suggest that lack of strength, or dynapenia, is a more constant factor in compromised wellbeing in old age and it is apparent that the decline in muscle mass and the decline in strength can take quite different trajectories. This demands recognition of the concept of muscle quality; that is the force generating per capacity per unit cross-sectional area (CSA). An understanding of the impact of aging on skeletal muscle will require attention to both the changes in muscle size and the changes in muscle quality. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of the decline in human muscle mass and strength with advancing age and the associated risk to health and survival and to review the underlying changes in muscle characteristics and the etiology of sarcopenia. Cross-sectional studies comparing young (18-45â years) and old (>65â years) samples show dramatic variation based on the technique used and population studied. The median of values of rate of loss reported across studies is 0.47% per year in men and 0.37% per year in women. Longitudinal studies show that in people aged 75â years, muscle mass is lost at a rate of 0.64-0.70% per year in women and 0.80-00.98% per year in men. Strength is lost more rapidly. Longitudinal studies show that at age 75â years, strength is lost at a rate of 3-4% per year in men and 2.5-3% per year in women. Studies that assessed changes in mass and strength in the same sample report a loss of strength 2-5 times faster than loss of mass. Loss of strength is a more consistent risk for disability and death than is loss of muscle mass. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Frontiers in Physiology;3, 260
dc.relation.uri http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22934016
dc.rights This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission en_US
dc.subject sarcopenia en_US
dc.subject dynapenia en_US
dc.subject skeletal muscle en_US
dc.subject aging en_US
dc.subject muscle atrophy en_US
dc.subject muscle aging en_US
dc.subject muscle quality en_US
dc.subject strength en_US
dc.title Sarcopenia, dynapenia, and the impact of advancing age on human skeletal muscle size and strength; a quantitative review en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2016-04-19T13:59:02Z
dc.description.version PUBLISHED
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 1435029
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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