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Development and evaluation of an educational intervention in youth mental health for primary care practitioners.

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dc.contributor.author Birrane, John
dc.contributor.author Swan, Davina
dc.contributor.author Aherne, Declan
dc.contributor.author Davis, Rachel
dc.contributor.author Hannigan, Ailish
dc.contributor.author McPhillips, David
dc.contributor.author Meagher, David
dc.contributor.author O'Regan, Andrew
dc.contributor.author Ryan, Patrick
dc.contributor.author Schaffalitzky, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.author Cullen, Walter
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-09T09:23:24Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-09T09:23:24Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/4531
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Objectives: Irish adolescents have one of the highest rates of suicide and self-harm in the European Union. Although primary care has been identified as an opportune environment in which to detect and treat mental health problems in adolescents, lack of training among primary care professionals (PCPs) is a barrier to optimum identification and treatment. We describe the development and evaluation of an educational intervention on youth mental health and substance misuse for PCPs. Methods: Thirty general practitioners and other PCPs working in the Mid-West region participated in an educational session on youth-friendly consultations, and identification and treatment of mental ill-health and substance use. Learning objectives were addressed through a presentation, video demonstration, small-group discussions, role play, question-and-answer sessions with clinical experts, and an information pack. Following the session, participants completed an evaluation form assessing knowledge gain and usefulness of different components of the session. Results: 71% of participants were involved in the provision of care to young people. 55% had no previous training in youth mental health or substance abuse. Participants rated knowledge gains as highest with regard to understanding the importance of early intervention, and primary care, in youth mental health. The components rated as most useful were case studies/small group discussion, the ‘question-and-answer session’ with clinical experts, and peer interaction. Conclusions: The educational session outlined in this pilot was feasible and acceptable and may represent an effective way to train professionals to help tackle the current crisis in youth mental health. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine;32, Special Issue 01, pp. 137-146
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/ipm.2014.71
dc.rights Material on these pages is copyright Cambridge University Press or reproduced with permission from other copyright owners. It may be downloaded and printed for personal reference, but not otherwise copied, altered in any way or transmitted to others (unless explicitly stated otherwise) without the written permission of Cambridge University Press. Hypertext links to other Web locations are for the convenience of users and do not constitute any endorsement or authorisation by Cambridge University Press. en_US
dc.subject youth mental health en_US
dc.subject primary health care en_US
dc.subject continuing medical education en_US
dc.title Development and evaluation of an educational intervention in youth mental health for primary care practitioners. en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1017/ipm.2014.71
dc.contributor.sponsor HRB en_US
dc.relation.projectid H4B_HRA 2010/4 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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