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Institutionalising language policy: mismatches in community and national goals

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dc.contributor.author Ó hIfearnáin, Tadhg
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-06T17:44:55Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-06T17:44:55Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/4221
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract The national profile of Gaelic in Scotland has changed in recent years. The profile, or image, of the language in the public space is a reflection of the way in which the majority of the population who do not speak Gaelic support a form of Gaelic presence in their lives, or at the very least tolerate it. In some respects this is a major achievement for those who have been working for a turn-around in the public perception of the language outside the language community. The general population's view of Gaelic undoubtedly influences attitudes towards the native language from within the Gaelic-speaking population as well, and so action in this domain is a central part of the overall policy implicit in the National Plan for Gaelic, 2007-2012 (Bard na Gáidhlig, 2007a). The arrival of Gaelic on the national stage has been a long process, Which started to gather momentum some 30 years ago, but which has made significant national impact particularly since the turn of the century. Gaelic has acquired a limited form of official status after the enactment of the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005. It has seen advances, albeit modest ones, in public educational provisional at all levels (Rogers & McLeod, 2007), and an expanded broadcast media presence. It has a visible presence on directional and informational road signage in what have been regarded as its traditional areas as well as in some of the major towns and within institutions of state. It is not at all certain, however, if any of these developments will have a positive impact on the number of active Gaelic speakers, nor if they will of themselves cause any resurgence in intergenerational transmission of the language from adult speakers and their communities to their children. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Dunedin Academic Press en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Coimhearsnachd na Gáidhlig an-Diugh Gaelic Communities Today, Munro, Gillian & Mac an Táilleir, Iain, (eds);chapter 3, pp. 35-47
dc.relation.uri http://www.dunedinacademicpress.co.uk/display.asp?K=9781903765852&sf1=contributor&st1=%22Gillian+Munro%22&m=2&dc=2
dc.rights First Published by Dunedin Academic Press 2010 en_US
dc.subject Gaelic en_US
dc.subject Scotland en_US
dc.subject language en_US
dc.title Institutionalising language policy: mismatches in community and national goals en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/bookPart en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2015-01-06T16:49:05Z
dc.description.version PUBLISHED
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 1390914
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.description.status Peer reviewed


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