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Caregiving is associated with low secretion rates of immunoglobulin A in saliva

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dc.contributor.author Gallagher, Stephen
dc.contributor.author Phillips, Anna C
dc.contributor.author Evans, Phil
dc.contributor.author Der, Geoff
dc.contributor.author Hunt, Kate
dc.contributor.author Carroll, Douglas
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-07T14:34:54Z
dc.date.available 2013-05-07T14:34:54Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/3076
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Although the chronic stress of caring for a sick/disabled relative has been associated with poorer immunity using a range of outcomes, its impact on secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) in saliva has yet to be examined. Three hypotheses were tested in analyses of data from a large community sample: first, caregivers would have lower S-IgA secretion rates than non-caregivers; second, the impact of caregiving on S-IgA would be particularly apparent in older participants; third, for caregivers, caregiving burden would be negatively associated with S-IgA. The sample comprised three distinct age cohorts, one young (N = 623), one middle aged (N = 639), and the other elderly (N = 582). Participants were classified as caregivers if they regularly cared for somebody other than routine childcare. Caregiving strain was measured and a caregiving burden index was then derived as the composite of the number of people being cared for, the type of care provided, and the residential status of the person being cared for. From 2-min saliva samples, SIgA secretion rate was measured. There was a significant caregiver status by age cohort interaction; caregivers in the eldest cohort had lower S-IgA secretion rates than their noncaregiving counterparts. Caregiving strain and burden and S-IgA were related, such that caregivers who experienced greater strain and burden had lower S-IgA secretion rates. These findings resonate with those from other studies using different immune outcomes. Considered together, it is clear that that the chronic stress of caregiving has widespread effects on immunity. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Brain, Behavior and Immunity;22, pp. 565-572
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2007.11.007
dc.rights This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Brain, Behavior and Immunity. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Brain, Behavior and Immunity, 22, pp. 565-572http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2007.11.007 en_US
dc.subject age en_US
dc.subject care giving en_US
dc.subject chronic stress en_US
dc.subject secretory immunoglobulin A en_US
dc.title Caregiving is associated with low secretion rates of immunoglobulin A in saliva en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor UK: The Medical Research Council (MRC) en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 1121630


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