University of Limerick Institutional Repository

Considering statins for cholesterol-reduction in children if lifestyle and diet changes do not improve their health: a review of the risks and benefits

DSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author O'Gorman, Clodagh S.
dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Michael B.
dc.contributor.author Conwell, Louise S.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-12T14:31:57Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-12T14:31:57Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/2882
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Children who appear healthy, even if they have one or more recognized cardiovascular risk factors, do not generally have outcomes of cardiovascular or other vascular disease during childhood. Historically, pediatric medicine has not aggressively screened for or treated cardiovascular risk factors in otherwise healthy children. However, studies such as the P-Day Study (Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth), and the Bogalusa Heart Study, indicate that healthy children at remarkably young ages can have evidence of significant atherosclerosis. With the increasing prevalence of pediatric obesity, can we expect more health problems related to the consequences of pediatric dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and atherosclerosis in the future? For many years, medications have been available and used in adult populations to treat dyslipidemia. In recent years, reports of short-term safety of some of these medications in children have been published. However, none of these studies have detailed long-term follow-up, and therefore none have described potential late side-effects of early cholesterol-lowering therapy, or potential benefits in terms of reduction of or delay in cardiovascular or other vascular end-points. In 2007, the American Heart Association published a scientific statement on the use of cholesterol-lowering therapy in pediatric patients. In this review paper, we discuss some of the current literature on cholesterol-lowering therapy in children, including the statins that are currently available for use in children, and some of the cautions with using these and other cholesterol-lowering medications. A central tenet of this review is that medications are not a substitute for dietary and lifestyle interventions, and that even in children on cholesterol-lowering medications, physicians should take every opportunity to encourage children and their parents to make healthy diet and lifestyle choices. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Dove Medical Press en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Vascular Health and Risk Management;7, pp. 1-14
dc.relation.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S7356
dc.rights First published by Dove Medical Press en_US
dc.subject cholesterol en_US
dc.subject statins en_US
dc.subject children en_US
dc.subject adolescent en_US
dc.subject vascular risk en_US
dc.title Considering statins for cholesterol-reduction in children if lifestyle and diet changes do not improve their health: a review of the risks and benefits en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ULIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics