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Pandemic threat and group cohesion: national identification in the wake of COVID-19 is associated with authoritarianism.

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dc.contributor.author Maher, Paul J.
dc.contributor.author Roth, Jenny
dc.contributor.author Griffin, Siobhán M.
dc.contributor.author Foran, Aoife-Marie
dc.contributor.author Jay, Sarah
dc.contributor.author McHugh, Cillian
dc.contributor.author Ryan, Megan
dc.contributor.author Bradshaw, Daragh
dc.contributor.author Quayle, Michael
dc.contributor.author Muldoon, Orla T.
dc.date.accessioned 2022-03-31T08:50:47Z
dc.date.available 2022-03-31T08:50:47Z
dc.date.issued 2022
dc.identifier.citation Maher PJ;Roth J;Griffin S;Foran AM;Jay S;McHugh C;Ryan M;Bradshaw D;Quayle M;Muldoon OT; (2022) 'Pandemic threat and group cohesion: national identification in the wake of COVID-19 is associated with authoritarianism'. Social Psychology, . en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1940-1183
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/11165
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Authoritarianism emerges in times of societal threat, in part driven by desires for group-based security. As such, we propose that the threat caused by the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with increased authoritarian tendencies and that this can be partially explained by increased national identification. We tested this hypothesis by collecting cross-sectional data from three different countries in April 2020. In Study 1, data from Ireland (N = 1276) showed that pandemic threat predicted increased national identification, which in turn predicted authoritarianism. In Study 2, we replicated this indirect effect in a representative UK sample (N = 506). In Study 3, we used an alternative measure of authoritarianism and conceptually replicated this effect among USA citizens (N = 429). In this US sample, the association between threat and authoritarian tendencies was stronger among progressives compared to conservatives. Findings are discussed and linked to group-based models of authoritarianism. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Taylor and Francis en_US
dc.relation 802421 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of Social Psychology;
dc.subject pandemic threat en_US
dc.subject authoritarianism en_US
dc.subject national identification en_US
dc.subject covid-19 en_US
dc.title Pandemic threat and group cohesion: national identification in the wake of COVID-19 is associated with authoritarianism. en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.date.updated 2022-03-31T08:18:56Z
dc.description.version PUBLISHED
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/00224545.2021.2024122
dc.contributor.sponsor Horizon 2020 en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor European Union (EU) en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor ERC en_US
dc.relation.projectid 802421 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US
dc.internal.rssid 3048529
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.identifier.journaltitle Social Psychology
dc.description.status peer-reviewed


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