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Designing a synthetic simulator to teach open surgical skills for limb exploration in trauma: a qualitative study exploring the experiences and perspectives of educators and surgical trainees

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dc.contributor.author Heskin, L.
dc.contributor.author Simms, C.
dc.contributor.author Traynor, O.
dc.contributor.author Galvin, Rose
dc.date.accessioned 2021-12-22T08:30:20Z
dc.date.available 2021-12-22T08:30:20Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/10872
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Background: Simulation is an important adjunct to aid in the acquisition of surgical skills of surgical trainees. The simulators used to adequately enable trainees to learn, practice and be assessed in surgical skills need to be of the highest standards. This study investigates the perceived requirements of simulation and simulators used to acquire skills in limb exploratory procedures in trauma. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with an international group of 11 surgical educators and 11 surgical trainees who had experience with surgical simulation. The interviews focused on the perceptions of simulation, the integration of simulators within a curriculum and the features of a simulator itself. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and underwent thematic analysis. Results: Analysis of the perspectives of surgical educators and surgical trainees on simulated training in limb trauma surgery yielded three main themes: (1) Attitudes to simulation. (2) Implementing simulation. (3) Features of an open skills simulator. The majority felt simulation was relevant, intuitive and a good way for procedure warmup and the supplementation of surgical logbooks. They felt simulation could be improved with increased accessibility and variety of simulator options tailored to the learner. Suggested simulator features included greater fidelity, haptic feedback and more complex inbuilt scenarios. On a practical level, there was a desire for cost effectiveness, easy set up and storage. The responses of the educators and the trainees were similar and reflected similar concerns and suggestions for improvement. Conclusion: There is a clear positive appetite for the incorporation of simulation into limb trauma training. The findings of this will inform the optimal requirements for high quality implementation of simulation into a surgical trauma curriculum and a reference to optimal features desired in simulator or task trainer design. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher BMC en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries BMC Surgery;21, 417
dc.subject Surgical simulation en_US
dc.subject Upper limb trauma en_US
dc.subject Surgical training en_US
dc.title Designing a synthetic simulator to teach open surgical skills for limb exploration in trauma: a qualitative study exploring the experiences and perspectives of educators and surgical trainees en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12893-021-01417-7
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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