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Association between work status and depression in informal caregivers: a collaborative modelling approach

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dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Aoife
dc.contributor.author Gallagher, Stephen
dc.contributor.author Hannigan, Ailish
dc.contributor.author Robinson, Katie
dc.date.accessioned 2021-12-01T11:42:11Z
dc.date.available 2021-12-01T11:42:11Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/10836
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Background: Care is regularly provided on an informal basis by family and friends and it is well established that caregivers experience high rates of depression. The majority of research on caregivers tends to focus on older, full-time caregivers, with less attention paid to working caregivers (in paid employment). The aim of this study is to explore the impact of work status on depression in caregivers. Methods: A sample of individuals from the 2014 European Social Survey dataset, aged 18 and older, who reported being a caregiver, were investigated (n ¼ 11 177). Differences in sociodemographic, mental and physical health and social network variables, between working and non-working caregivers, were investigated. Hierarchical logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between the caregivers’ work status and depression. This study was developed in partnership with a panel of caregivers who contributed to the conceptualization and interpretation of the statistical analysis. Results: Findings showed that 51% of caregivers reported being in paid employment. Non-working caregivers were more likely to be female, older, widowed, have lower education levels and provide intensive caring hours. They were also more likely to report depressive symptoms than working caregivers after controlling for sociodemographic, social networks and intensity of caring (adjusted odds ratio ¼ 1.77, 95% confidence interval ¼ 1.54–2.03). The panel considered policies to support continued work important as a means of maintaining positive mental health for caregivers. Conclusions: Supportive policies, such as flexible working and care leave, are recommended to allow caregivers to continue in paid work and better manage their health, caring and working responsibilities en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Oxford University Press en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries European Journal of Public Health;pp. 1–7
dc.subject Care en_US
dc.subject depression en_US
dc.title Association between work status and depression in informal caregivers: a collaborative modelling approach en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/eurpub/ckab178
dc.contributor.sponsor HRI en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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