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‘I hated being ghosted’ – The relevance of social participation for living well with post-stroke aphasia: Qualitative interviews with working aged adults

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dc.contributor.author Manning, Molly
dc.contributor.author MacFarlane, Anne E.
dc.contributor.author Hickey, Anne
dc.contributor.author Galvin, Rose
dc.contributor.author Franklin, Sue
dc.date.accessioned 2021-08-09T12:01:05Z
dc.date.available 2021-08-09T12:01:05Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/10463
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Background In the context of increasing incidence of stroke in working aged adults, there is a specific need to explore the views of working aged adults with post-stroke aphasia, whose communication difficulties may result in restricted social participation, loss of employment and changed relationship and parenting roles. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of working aged adults with post-stroke aphasia in relation to social participation and living well with aphasia (LWA). Design and participants We conducted qualitative interviews with 14 people with post-stroke aphasia (PWA). Data were analysed following principles of reflexive, thematic analysis. Patient or Public Contribution: A Public and Patient Involvement aphasia advisory group inputted into the study design and interpretation of data. Results Social participation spanned 5 themes: Relationships and roles; Social support; Peer network, Aphasia awareness; and Employment and training. Meaningful, interesting social participation for LWA is individually defined. Working aged PWA may require flexible support with parenting, accessing a diverse social network and finding opportunities for meaningful social connection, training and employment. Conclusions The findings extend knowledge of social participation in the context of LWA for working aged adults by elucidating the individually defined nature of meaningful participation and how PWA may need flexible support with parenting, accessing a diverse social network and training and employment. For aphasia research, policy and services to be relevant, it is crucial that working aged PWA are meaningfully involved in setting the aphasia agenda. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Wiley and Sons Ltd en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Health Expectations;
dc.subject aphasia en_US
dc.subject patient involvement en_US
dc.subject rehabilitation en_US
dc.subject social participation en_US
dc.subject social support en_US
dc.title ‘I hated being ghosted’ – The relevance of social participation for living well with post-stroke aphasia: Qualitative interviews with working aged adults en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/hex.13291
dc.contributor.sponsor HRB en_US
dc.relation.projectid SPHeRE/2013/1 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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