University of Limerick Institutional Repository

Assessment of the microbial load of airway clearance devices used by a cohort of children with cystic fibrosis

DSpace Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Linnane, Barry
dc.contributor.author O'Connell, Nuala H.
dc.contributor.author Obande, E.
dc.contributor.author Dunne, Suzanne S.
dc.contributor.author Clancy, C.
dc.contributor.author Kiernan, Miranda G.
dc.contributor.author McGrath, D.
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, K.J.
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Leonard
dc.contributor.author Dunne, Colum P.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-08-04T11:22:36Z
dc.date.available 2021-08-04T11:22:36Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/10441
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Background: Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) devices are an important element of the management of cystic fibrosis, and of other respiratory diseases. Whereas there have been reports in the literature of contamination of airway clearance devices and their surfaces by microbial pathogens, there is little evidence available regarding such contamination and its contribution to respiratory infection. Aim: To establish whether pathogenic bacteria can contaminate PEP devices in the con text of normal cleaning and maintenance practices. Methods: Patients’ home-use clearance devices were brought to a routine clinic appointment and collected for microbiology sampling and analysis. The patients were provided with replacement devices. Nineteen such devices were collected from 17 patients, reflecting use of multiple devices by some patients. Swabs were taken and cultured from each patient’s used device, the patient’s airway, as well as from new unopened and unused devices that acted as controls. Results: Seven of 19 devices (37%) tested positive for presence of pathogenic bacteria. Device-cleaning methods varied among patients and non-sterilization methods were found to be ineffective at removing pathogens. Microbial species found on the devices did not correlate with those identified from airway swabs. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of pathogens on positive expiratory pressure devices. The potential for transmission of these pathogens to the patient’s airway and the risk of infection remains unclear and requires further study. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Infection Prevention in Practice;3, 100153
dc.subject cystic fibrosis en_US
dc.subject positive expiratory pressure en_US
dc.subject oscillating intrapulmonary en_US
dc.subject pressure (OPEP) en_US
dc.subject microbiology en_US
dc.subject hygiene en_US
dc.subject cleaning en_US
dc.title Assessment of the microbial load of airway clearance devices used by a cohort of children with cystic fibrosis en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.infpip.2021.100153
dc.contributor.sponsor EI en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor ERDF en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor European Union (EU) en_US
dc.relation.projectid CF-2016-0428-P en_US
dc.relation.projectid 2014e2020 en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ULIR


Browse

My Account

Statistics