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Modelling and experimental characterisation of a magnetic shuttle pump for microfluidic applications

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dc.contributor.author Nico, Valeria
dc.contributor.author Dalton, Eric D.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-07-20T07:26:01Z
dc.date.available 2021-07-20T07:26:01Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/10384
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Microfluidic technology witnessed a fast growth in recent years thanks to its diverse nature that allows its use in a wide range of industries including microelectronics, aerospace, telecommunications, biomedical and pharmaceutical. One of the limiting issues for the implementation of microfluidics in high end electronics or biomedical devices is that pumps are not able to develop the required flow rates and pressures. A novel magnetic shuttle pump (MSP) technology that can achieve class-leading pressure and flow rate and a numerical model are presented in this paper. The MSP technology consists of an oscillating neodymium ring shuttle magnet housed in a solenoid driver. Two counter-wound copper coils are used to oscillate the shuttle magnet. The numerical model couples the electromagnetic and fluidic properties of the MSP by taking into account the forces acting on the shuttle magnet. The model is used to predict the pump characteristics of two MSPs with different size: the MSP1.7 with overall volume 1.7 cm3 and MSP3.3 with overall volume 3.3 cm3. Simulations and experimental characterisation were carried out considering an electric driving power of 1W. Experimentally, a maximum pressure Pmax = 43.53 kPa and a maximum flow rate Q˙ = 46.69 ml/min were achieved by the MSP1.7, while a maximum pressure Pmax = 21.74 kPa and a maximum flow rate Q˙ = 205.99 ml/min were achieved by the MSP3.3. Due to the close agreement between the experimental and simulated data, the model can be used in the future to modify the design of the MSP to achieve the required Pressure/Flow characteristics en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Sensors and Actuators A;331, 112910
dc.subject Microfluidics en_US
dc.subject Micropump en_US
dc.title Modelling and experimental characterisation of a magnetic shuttle pump for microfluidic applications en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.sna.2021.112910
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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