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Digital detectives: Websleuthing reduces eyewitness identification accuracy in police lineups

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dc.contributor.author Elphick, Camilla
dc.contributor.author Philpot, Richard
dc.contributor.author Zhang, Min
dc.contributor.author Stuart, Avelie
dc.contributor.author Pike, Graham
dc.contributor.author Strathie, Ailsa
dc.contributor.author Havard, Catriona
dc.contributor.author Walkington, Zoe
dc.contributor.author Frumkin, Lara A.
dc.contributor.author Levine, Mark
dc.contributor.author Price, Blaine A.
dc.contributor.author Bandara, Arosha K.
dc.contributor.author Nuseibeh, Bashar
dc.date.accessioned 2021-07-05T14:35:47Z
dc.date.available 2021-07-05T14:35:47Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/10302
dc.description peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract Eyewitnesses to crimes sometimes search for a culprit on social media before viewing a police lineup, but it is not known whether this affects subsequent lineup identification accuracy. The present online study was conducted to address this. Two hundred and eighty-five participants viewed a mock crime video, and after a 15–20 min delay either (i) viewed a mock social media site including the culprit, (ii) viewed a mock social media site including a lookalike, or (iii) completed a filler task. A week later, participants made an identification from a photo lineup. It was predicted that searching for a culprit on social media containing the lookalike (rather than the culprit) would reduce lineup identification accuracy. There was a significant association between social media exposure and lineup accuracy for the Target Present lineup (30% more of the participants who saw the lookalike on social media failed to positively identify the culprit than participants in the other conditions), but for the Target Absent lineup (which also included the lookalike) there was no significant association with lineup identification accuracy. The results suggest that if an eyewitness sees a lookalike (where they are expecting to see the culprit) when conducting a self-directed search on social media, they are less likely to subsequently identify the culprit in the formal ID procedure. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Frontiers in Psychology;2, article 640513
dc.subject digital detective en_US
dc.subject websleuth en_US
dc.subject eyewitness en_US
dc.subject lineup identification en_US
dc.subject police lineup en_US
dc.subject social media en_US
dc.subject post-event information en_US
dc.title Digital detectives: Websleuthing reduces eyewitness identification accuracy in police lineups en_US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_published_reviewed en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.640513
dc.contributor.sponsor ESPRC en_US
dc.contributor.sponsor SFI en_US
dc.relation.projectid 13/RC/2094 en_US
dc.relation.projectid 16/SP/3804 en_US
dc.relation.projectid EP/R013144/1 en_US
dc.relation.projectid EP/R033862/1 EPSRC en_US
dc.rights.accessrights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess en_US


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