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Best practice for delivering a computer based training programme to a transition year school group : the case of autotrack and autotest for EDCL

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dc.contributor.advisor Hancock, Gerry
dc.contributor.author Hogan, Thomas Brendan
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-04T11:23:30Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-04T11:23:30Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10344/454
dc.description non-peer-reviewed en_US
dc.description.abstract The IT 2000 initiative kick started the drive to incorporate ICT into teaching and learning in the Irish education system. In the secondary sector, in particular, the availability of suitable software programmes has been sadly lacking. The ECDL programme is an international benchmark for basic computer literacy. The main focus of this action research project was to find best practice for delivering this computer based training programme to a transition year school group and so explore ways of improving learning and teaching competencies. The study is based on a comparative analysis between two cohorts of twelve students from within the same transition year group, using a combination of the traditional and the automated training methods [Autotrack and Autotest]. Action research was the research approach thought most appropriate for this study and the following research tools were utilised: assessments; questionnaires; diaries; interviews; research journal; data collection and analysis; focus group discussions; structured and unstructured interviews and observational data. The main findings of this research show that manual training combined with Autotrack has improved results in Autotest; manual training combined with Autotrack has improved the success rate in Autotest; in-application tuition is essential to get a full understanding of difficult topics; all students felt more confident about their abilities with computer applications on completion of the three designated modules; Autotest was considered to be more realistic, more satisfying and more enjoyable than Autotrack. The key conclusion is that delivery of the course could be improved by using blended learning: a combination of the computer based training (Autotrack) in conjunction with traditional structured lessons. The main recommendations include the Irish Computer Society (ICS) taking a more active role in the pedagogical implications of their ECDL programme; that course providers incorporate access to live applications; that the course tutor adjusts his or her teaching methods to take account of individual needs of the less able student. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher University of Limerick, Department of Education and Professional Studies en_US
dc.subject education en_US
dc.subject ICT en_US
dc.subject ECDL
dc.title Best practice for delivering a computer based training programme to a transition year school group : the case of autotrack and autotest for EDCL en_US
dc.type Master thesis (Taught) en_US
dc.type.supercollection all_ul_research en_US
dc.type.supercollection ul_theses_dissertations en_US
dc.type.restriction none en

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